Maud Florance Gatewood (1934-2004)

Maud Gatewood once said, “[Art] is like people: If you meet a person that's absolutely pleasant, they tend to be innocuous. Nothing's worse than being pleasant.” Another time she said, “I think you learn that life isn't always straightforward. I think it's in the nature of the species to be a little evasive and covered. Ambiguity might be the heart of life as well as art.” (more)

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Harold Crowell (born 1952)

One of HMA's other Crowell paintings, The Gourd Lady), is of life-long Conover resident Margaret Sparkman. She had adopted this persona as her artist identity, in that creativity with gourds was her medium; and that landed her a spot on the Jay Leno show in 2003.

The son of a minister, Crowell has been developmentally disabled from birth. As a child,  (more)

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Romare Bearden (1911-1988)

Early on, Charlotte-born and Harlem-raised Bearden debated whether to be an artist, a musician, or a professional baseball player. As a painter, he used ideas from math and music, especially jazz, in his art, along with aspects of his many other influences. As a result, (more)

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Juie Rattley III

Between October 2013 and January 2014, HMA exhibited a selection of paintings by the North Carolina artist Juie Rattley III in a show called Chaos and Control. At that time, Rattley spoke about how he experiences his creativity. (more)

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Sharif Bey (born mid-1970's)

In the Spring of 2007, ceramic sculptor Sharif Bey's ornamental yet functional pots and and his necklaces of massive ceremonial beads were exhibited at HMA in a one-person show, amidst some mild controversy. He said of his works that "This series of work combines my interest in African, Indian, Pre-Columbian, Native American, and Modernist sculpture while still applying the rigid functional criteria I acquired as a potter.” (more)

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Minnie Reinhardt (1898-1986)

Minnie Reinhardt was often referred to as "the Grandma Moses of Catawba County." She used a primitive style to to paint from recollections of her childhood. She said about wanting to paint that "I was just real interested in it. If you're not, you don't want to mess with it. You can't do nothing without being interested and wanting to do it more than anything else -- that's the main thing."  (more)

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The Museum's galleries

The Hickory Museum of Art shares space with other Hickory cultural organizations in the SALT Block, the extensively renovated former Claremont High School building. The Museum occupies three floors with nine galleries. Many of the galleries are named for HMA supporters.

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Steve Brooks (born 1962)

"Trees are vital to life, mythic. Their symbolism is woven into our subconscious mind, informing us on a basic level.  The tree image is in our dreams and stories.  The image and meaning is as complex and important to us as we believe we are to the world." (Artist's Statement.)

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James H. BURRUS (1894-1955)

"The importance of art in awakening a sense of the appreciation of beauty cannot be measured. Even meager training in Art opens the eyes. Nothing is ever quite the same once you have learned enough about art to see the color variations in the trees, or the clouds – why,” he said, smiling broadly, “suddenly you realize there’s more beauty in one day than you could exhaust in a century.“

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JOËL URRUTY (born 1968)

Between September 19, 2015 and February 28, 2016, HMA welcomes back Hickory artist Joël Urruty in an exhibition that includes gilded sculptures and wall hangings of woven wood strips. Urruty won Best of Show in the Museum’s 2013 Road Trip: A Juried Exhibition, in conjunction with HMA's First AutoLawn Party in 2013.

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Wink Gaines

"I have always found peace and solace in the outdoors and in nature. Wildlife photography combines many skill sets including ruggedness, patience, knowledge of the subject, knowledge of your camera, composition and noting the way light does its magic within your preconceived image." A selection of Hickory native Gaines' photographs will be on display at HMA between September 26, 2015 and January 10, 2016.

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Wiili Armstrong (1956-2003)

"He was on medication, but art was a significant part of his therapy also." He loved the bipolar highs which was when he did much of his painting. In his own words, he was a “junk assembler, a garbage collector … a waking sleeper. A regular-kind-of-guy who just happens to know for certain he is an artist.”

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