Elizabeth Catlett (1915-2012)

"Printmaking for [Elizabeth] Catlett is a consciously political practice. At the same time, however, her prints – some intricately detailed and others elegantly spare – manifest her understanding that the power of an image resides in the artist’s command of form, sensitivity to materials and technical proficiency."

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Philip Moose (1921-2001)

The unassuming but quietly charming Blowing Rock resident Philip Anthony Moose was a world traveler, Army veteran, Pulitzer Prize winner (for art, in 1948) and a prolific painter. Born in Newton, N.C. as the fifth of seven children, Moose studied art at ...

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Jacob Armstead Lawrence (1917-2000)

When Jacob Lawrence died in Seattle in 2000, the New York Times described him as "One of America's leading modern figurative painters" and "among the most impassioned visual chroniclers of the African-American experience." His North Carolina connection was his first teaching job, at Black Mountain College in 1946, after having served in the U.S.Navy recording in paint the life on board the first integrated ship in the naval services during World War II.

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A Tragic Tale from the Collection.

In 1939, before the Museum was established, Paul Whitener was commissioned by former Hickory Mayor Phillip J. Suttlemyre (1937-1938) to paint his 9 year old son Charles, which he did charmingly. Years later, in the spring of 1960, on Friday May 13th the headlines of the Hickory Daily Record read “Mentally Ill Son Charged in Matricide.” Charles G. Suttlemyer was said to have admitted killing his mother by bludgeoning her with a souvenir tomahawk.

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Asher Brown Durand (1796-1886)

Asher Brown Durand is known as a prolific American painter of the Hudson River School; and before that he was a prolific engraver. He turned to painting in his mid-30’s, first doing portraits (such as in 1835 of Andrew Jackson who was then President) before moving on to landscapes. His landscapes show the engraver’s close attention to detail: as an example, in his Pastoral Scene, every bit of foliage can be individually distinguished. How was he regarded by his contemporaries?

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About this blog

With our new blog, we hope to give you a flavor of how the Museum works, who our staff and many volunteers are and what they do, and who visits us physically or in other ways. And, we will sample what we have in our collection,

It is part of my responsibilities as Project Coordinator on the staff to put together our blog posts. So what are my qualifications? And what are those photos about?

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Jane Peterson (1876-1965)

Jane Peterson’s ambition was to be judged not as a woman but as a painter, and this she achieved. She became famous for a wide range of works from landscapes to still-lives. The Windowseat is typical of Peterson’s adaptation of American Impressionism. It is a perennial favorite of our Museum visitors.

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Romare Bearden (1911-1988): Service in WWII

Charlotte, NC painter Romare Bearden (1911-1988) was another of HMA's artists who served in WWII. His experience of service was an example of the continuing effects of racial discrimination in the United States, even during war. He joined the United States Army in 1942 and served until 1945 in the (all-black) 372nd Infantry Division of the 15th Regiment.He is pictured in uniform and later with his cat.

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