Joel Sartore (born 1962)

Between September 16, 2007 and February 25, 2018, HMA's exhibition Endangered: a Joel Sartore Retrospective will showcase Sartore's environmental passion with an installation of fifty-five gorgeous examples of his animal photography. This artwork illustrates both the beauty and the tragedy of animal species threatened by extinction. (More here)

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Mickey

Mickey McKinney Whitener Coe with Dipsey Doodle. The dog's name references two of Paul's & Mickey's favorite activities: the Dipsy Doodle was a popular song and dance in the late 1930s, and it is also a move in football.  Of course, they also founded (Paul) and grew (Mickey) an art museum. (More here.)

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George Pearse Ennis (1884-1936)

At their monthly meeting in May 2017, the Acquisitions Committee was excited to accept the gift of George Pearse Ennis' undated watercolor Village Carpenters from Barry Huffman. The gift celebrates the appointment of Jon Carfagno as the fifth Director of the Hickory Museum of Art. (more here about Ennis)

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More works added since summer 2016

Most recently, former Board member and current Honorary Trustee Josephine Hambrick donated to HMA the lovely portrait that Paul Whitener painted of her as a young girl in 1938, and the Acquisitions Committee was delighted to accept this gift. Paul of course was the Museum's founder, and (more)

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Bessie Harvey (1929-1994)

Harvey had a special regard for tongues, as she explained in an interview towards the end of her life, "He speaks that all animals and everything in the earth has been tamed by mankind except the tongue, ... the tongue cannot be tamed. So before you use it to say things that will hurt yourself or someone else, remember that love covers a multitude of faults, and it's a fault to go around hurting others."  (more)

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Shirley Pruden (1927-2007)

A February 16, 1953 article in The Hickory Daily Record on the topic of HMA’s 1952 acquisitions says of Shirley Pruden's The Aerialist that “It is an excellent work which shows superb knowledge of anatomy as applied to the human figure and is unusually brilliant in color.”  This was the first work by a woman artist that had been purchased by the Museum.  (more)

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The Joys of Senior Outreach

Theresa Gloster, a folk-artist from Lenoir, NC, was part of this year's HMA project of bringing the joy of art to a group of financially challenged Catawba County seniors. This HMA program was started last year with funding from the State of North Carolina and the National Endowment for the Arts, through the North Carolina Arts Council, the Unifour Foundation and United Arts Council of Catawba County. Gloster's program partner speaks of her experience working with (more)

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Elliott Daingerfield (1859 – 1932)

The prolific North Carolina painter Elliott Daingerfield argued against both literalness in painting ("If reproduction of surface fact be the ultimate of the painter's mission, then is he of all men most petty and miserable.") and imitation, regarding which he held that "The answer is, in art each man must be a leader, not a follower, for no two are alike, no two souls are given the same message, and while it may amuse the critic to trace likeness, the great truth remains that true art is personal."  (more)

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Arlee Trivett Mains (Born in the mid-1930’s)

"Finally I decided that I’m going to paint that old church [at home] just like I remember it. And that’s what I did. When the canvas was finished I liked it. That’s what started me to painting like I paint. I paint things I remember.” 

Between April 23 and July 24, 2016, a selection of Arlee’s paintings on loan from Art Cellar Gallery and local collectors will be on display at HMA. (more)

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Maud Florance Gatewood (1934-2004)

Maud Gatewood once said, “[Art] is like people: If you meet a person that's absolutely pleasant, they tend to be innocuous. Nothing's worse than being pleasant.” Another time she said, “I think you learn that life isn't always straightforward. I think it's in the nature of the species to be a little evasive and covered. Ambiguity might be the heart of life as well as art.” (more)

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Harold Crowell (born 1952)

One of HMA's other Crowell paintings, The Gourd Lady), is of life-long Conover resident Margaret Sparkman. She had adopted this persona as her artist identity, in that creativity with gourds was her medium; and that landed her a spot on the Jay Leno show in 2003.

The son of a minister, Crowell has been developmentally disabled from birth. As a child,  (more)

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Romare Bearden (1911-1988)

Early on, Charlotte-born and Harlem-raised Bearden debated whether to be an artist, a musician, or a professional baseball player. As a painter, he used ideas from math and music, especially jazz, in his art, along with aspects of his many other influences. As a result, (more)

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