Bessie Harvey (1929-1994)

Harvey had a special regard for tongues, as she explained in an interview towards the end of her life, "He speaks that all animals and everything in the earth has been tamed by mankind except the tongue, ... the tongue cannot be tamed. So before you use it to say things that will hurt yourself or someone else, remember that love covers a multitude of faults, and it's a fault to go around hurting others."  (more)

Read More

Shirley Pruden (1927-2007)

A February 16, 1953 article in The Hickory Daily Record on the topic of HMA’s 1952 acquisitions says of Shirley Pruden's The Aerialist that “It is an excellent work which shows superb knowledge of anatomy as applied to the human figure and is unusually brilliant in color.”  This was the first work by a woman artist that had been purchased by the Museum.  (more)

Read More

The Joys of Senior Outreach

Theresa Gloster, a folk-artist from Lenoir, NC, was part of this year's HMA project of bringing the joy of art to a group of financially challenged Catawba County seniors. This HMA program was started last year with funding from the State of North Carolina and the National Endowment for the Arts, through the North Carolina Arts Council, the Unifour Foundation and United Arts Council of Catawba County. Gloster's program partner speaks of her experience working with (more)

Read More

Elliott Daingerfield (1859 – 1932)

The prolific North Carolina painter Elliott Daingerfield argued against both literalness in painting ("If reproduction of surface fact be the ultimate of the painter's mission, then is he of all men most petty and miserable.") and imitation, regarding which he held that "The answer is, in art each man must be a leader, not a follower, for no two are alike, no two souls are given the same message, and while it may amuse the critic to trace likeness, the great truth remains that true art is personal."  (more)

Read More

Arlee Trivett Mains (Born in the mid-1930’s)

"Finally I decided that I’m going to paint that old church [at home] just like I remember it. And that’s what I did. When the canvas was finished I liked it. That’s what started me to painting like I paint. I paint things I remember.” 

Between April 23 and July 24, 2016, a selection of Arlee’s paintings on loan from Art Cellar Gallery and local collectors will be on display at HMA. (more)

Read More

Maud Florance Gatewood (1934-2004)

Maud Gatewood once said, “[Art] is like people: If you meet a person that's absolutely pleasant, they tend to be innocuous. Nothing's worse than being pleasant.” Another time she said, “I think you learn that life isn't always straightforward. I think it's in the nature of the species to be a little evasive and covered. Ambiguity might be the heart of life as well as art.” (more)

Read More

Harold Crowell (born 1952)

One of HMA's other Crowell paintings, The Gourd Lady), is of life-long Conover resident Margaret Sparkman. She had adopted this persona as her artist identity, in that creativity with gourds was her medium; and that landed her a spot on the Jay Leno show in 2003.

The son of a minister, Crowell has been developmentally disabled from birth. As a child,  (more)

Read More

Romare Bearden (1911-1988)

Early on, Charlotte-born and Harlem-raised Bearden debated whether to be an artist, a musician, or a professional baseball player. As a painter, he used ideas from math and music, especially jazz, in his art, along with aspects of his many other influences. As a result, (more)

Read More

Juie Rattley III

Between October 2013 and January 2014, HMA exhibited a selection of paintings by the North Carolina artist Juie Rattley III in a show called Chaos and Control. At that time, Rattley spoke about how he experiences his creativity. (more)

Read More

Sharif Bey (born mid-1970's)

In the Spring of 2007, ceramic sculptor Sharif Bey's ornamental yet functional pots and and his necklaces of massive ceremonial beads were exhibited at HMA in a one-person show, amidst some mild controversy. He said of his works that "This series of work combines my interest in African, Indian, Pre-Columbian, Native American, and Modernist sculpture while still applying the rigid functional criteria I acquired as a potter.” (more)

Read More

Minnie Reinhardt (1898-1986)

Minnie Reinhardt was often referred to as "the Grandma Moses of Catawba County." She used a primitive style to to paint from recollections of her childhood. She said about wanting to paint that "I was just real interested in it. If you're not, you don't want to mess with it. You can't do nothing without being interested and wanting to do it more than anything else -- that's the main thing."  (more)

Read More

The Museum's galleries

The Hickory Museum of Art shares space with other Hickory cultural organizations in the SALT Block, the extensively renovated former Claremont High School building. The Museum occupies three floors with nine galleries. Many of the galleries are named for HMA supporters.

Read More

Steve Brooks (born 1962)

"Trees are vital to life, mythic. Their symbolism is woven into our subconscious mind, informing us on a basic level.  The tree image is in our dreams and stories.  The image and meaning is as complex and important to us as we believe we are to the world." (Artist's Statement.)

Read More

James H. BURRUS (1894-1955)

"The importance of art in awakening a sense of the appreciation of beauty cannot be measured. Even meager training in Art opens the eyes. Nothing is ever quite the same once you have learned enough about art to see the color variations in the trees, or the clouds – why,” he said, smiling broadly, “suddenly you realize there’s more beauty in one day than you could exhaust in a century.“

Read More